MEN KNOWLEDGE/AWARENESS LEVEL ON BIRTH PREPAREDNESS AND COMPLICATION READINESS IN MAGARINI SUB COUNTY

Authors

  • Leila Chepkemboi School of Public Health Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology
  • Dr Yeri Kombe Centre of Public Health Research (CPHR) Kenya Medical Research Institute
  • Professor A.O. Makokha Department of Food Science and Technology Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.47604/jhmn.1388

Keywords:

knowledge/awareness level, birth preparedness, complication readiness, Magarini Sub County

Abstract

Purpose: This study sought to find out the knowledge/awareness level of men on birth preparedness and complication readiness in Magarini Sub County.

Methodology: A cross-sectional study sequential mixed methods design was used where a total of 464 men will be enrolled. Quantitative data was collected using semi structured questionnaires and interview guides were used to collect qualitative data.  Quantitative data was coded, and analyzed by SPSS software.  Qualitative data was analyzed using NVIVO software. Chi- square test was used to determine associations between categorical variables and Logistics regression was used to identify factors associated with birth preparedness and complication readiness. The associations between awareness and each independent variable were determined by odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Thematic content analysis was applied for qualitative data analysis.

Findings: The result indicated that the odds of pregnancies resulting  in a baby that was born alive were 47.306 times higher for more than two pregnancies as compared to one pregnancy(Odds=47.306,p=0.000). The odds of pregnancies resulting  in a baby that was born alive were 16.25 times higher for one  pregnancies as compared to no  pregnancy(Odds=16.25,p=0.000).

Unique contribution to theory, practice and policy Birth Preparedness and Complication Readiness (BPACR) should be endorsed as an essential component of safe motherhood programs to reduce delays for care-seeking for obstetric emergencies and this has been proven to positively impact on birth outcomes

Keywords: knowledge/awareness level, birth preparedness, complication readiness, Magarini Sub County

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Author Biographies

Leila Chepkemboi, School of Public Health Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology

Post Graduate Student

Dr Yeri Kombe , Centre of Public Health Research (CPHR) Kenya Medical Research Institute

Researcher

Professor A.O. Makokha , Department of Food Science and Technology Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology

Lecturer

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Published

2021-10-07

How to Cite

Chepkemboi, L. ., Kombe , . Y. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ., & Makokha , A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (2021). MEN KNOWLEDGE/AWARENESS LEVEL ON BIRTH PREPAREDNESS AND COMPLICATION READINESS IN MAGARINI SUB COUNTY. Journal of Health, Medicine and Nursing, 7(2), 56 – 63. https://doi.org/10.47604/jhmn.1388

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