Journal of Health, Medicine and Nursing https://www.iprjb.org/journals/index.php/JHMN <p>Journal of Health Medicine and Nursing( JHMN) is a peer reviewed journal published by IPRJB.Published both online and printed version the scope of the journal include physical and mental health, diet exercises ,science on health issues ,public health and safety issues ,mechanism in medicine technology and manufacturing of medicine ,diagnosis surgery , health care nursing practices ,nurse training and education ,nursing ethics etc.JHMN is one of the best journal accredited for vital insight information.</p> IPRJB en-US Journal of Health, Medicine and Nursing 2520-4025 INFLUENCE OF HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES ON THE PERFORMANCE OF HEALTH WORKERS IN KIAMBU COUNTY, KENYA https://www.iprjb.org/journals/index.php/JHMN/article/view/1353 <p><strong><em>Purpose</em></strong><em>:</em> The general objective of the study was to establish the role of human resource management practices on the performance of health workers in Kiambu County, Kenya.</p> <p><strong><em>Methodology</em></strong><em>:</em> The study adopted cross sectional research design, using both descriptive quantitative and qualitative techniques. The study targeted managers and workers of four hospitals which were purposefully chosen. The data was collected by administering questionnaires to the respondents and conducting KII to the managers. The data was analyzed using SPSS V27. The data was presented using tables and charts to summarize responses. For further analysis and comparison, the generated quantitative reports were subjected through tabulations, percentages, measure of central tendencies, correlation coefficient, chi square test, and inferential statistics.</p> <p><strong><em>Findings:</em></strong> The study reviewed that training opportunities and performance management practices improves staff motivation and performance (mean of 4.23, and 4.13). Planning (2.66) was biggest hindrances to utilizing training to improve performance. The managers were not well trained on using appraisals, ratings and feedback (2.06) for performance management. The institutions were not embracing performance culture (2.60), and using it for continuous improvement (1.82). Additionally, the study showed that hospitals did not carry out performance measurement regularly (2.81) and the systems for data collection were inadequate (2.43).</p> <p><strong><em>Unique contribution to theory, practice and policy:</em></strong> The study showed that human resource management practices improve health workers performance. Institutions should formulate and review policies to support human resource management practices that improve performance of the health workers</p> Jacob Mutwiri Eunice Mwangi Osiyel Edwin Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Health, Medicine and Nursing 2021-08-23 2021-08-23 7 2 1 18 10.47604/jhmn.1353 PREVALENCE OF HYPERTENSIVE DISORDERS AMONG PREGNANT WOMEN ATTENDING ANTENATAL CARE IN SELECTED PUBLIC HOSPITALS IN ADDIS ABABA, ETHIOPIA https://www.iprjb.org/journals/index.php/JHMN/article/view/1365 <p><strong>Purpose: </strong>This study sought to assess the prevalence of hypertension in pregnancy and associated risk factors among women attending antenatal care clinics in selected Pubic Hospitals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.</p> <p><strong>Materials and</strong> <strong>Methods: </strong>The research employed a cross-sectional descriptive study design. Study population was pregnant women who attended ANC care in selected hospital.&nbsp; The respondents were randomly selected from Tikur Anbesa specialized, Zewuditu Memorial and St. Paul’s Millennium medical college hospitals. Respondents for interview were selected using systematic random sampling at an interval of nine until a sample size of 297 was reached. The study used an adopting both quantitative and qualitative data collection methods. Quantitative data was collected using structured questionnaires from pregnant women attending antenatal care clinics while qualitative data was collected using key informant interview schedules and Focused Group Discussion guides with Nurses in charge of antenatal care clinics and primary respondents respectively. Key informants and focused group discussants were purposively selected. Descriptive data was analysed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 20.0 with the aid of Microsoft Excel program to generate frequency tables, graphs and pie-charts. Qualitative data was analysed using thematic analysis and results triangulated with quantitative data as direct quotes or narrations. Inferential statistics were calculated using Chi-Square tests done at 95% confidence interval and a margin of error of 0.05 to establish the association between variables. Information generated were presented in the text in the form of tables, bar graphs and pie charts.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong>The study results revealed that the prevalence of pregnancy induced hypertension in Addis Ababa was 21.9%. Socio-demographic factors such as age (p=0.030), occupation (p=0.031), income (p=0.0014), highest level of education (p=0.001) and health insurance (p=0.001) were significantly associated with occurrence of hypertension in pregnancy. Rreproductive and obstetric factors such as age at first pregnancy (p=0.001), gravidity (p=0.046), parity (p=0.001), history of obesity (p=0.001) and occurrence of gestational diabetes (p=0.002) were significantly associated with hypertension in pregnancy. More than a half (51.9%) of respondents had negative attitude towards hypertensive disorder in pregnancy. The level of attitude (p=0.040) was significantly associated with occurrence of hypertension in pregnancy.</p> <p><strong>Unique contribution to theory, practice and policy</strong><strong>: </strong>The study recommends that the management of the 3 health facilities together with other stakeholders in health empower women to start income generating projects to increase their financial access to antenatal care services consequently reduces hindrances that may lead to pregnancy complications such as hypertensive disorders in pregnancy.</p> Weynshet Firisa Lister Onsongo Judy Mugo Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Health, Medicine and Nursing 2021-09-07 2021-09-07 7 2 19 44 10.47604/jhmn.1365 CAREGIVERS’ EXPERIENCES IN CARING FOR HIV POSITIVE CHILDREN: A QUALITATIVE STUDY AT A COMPREHENSIVE CARE CENTRE IN KENYA https://www.iprjb.org/journals/index.php/JHMN/article/view/1384 <p><strong>Purpose:</strong> Caring for HIV positive children poses various challenges and uncertainties depending on the disclosure of their status. To explore the caregivers’ experiences in caring for HIV positive children before, during and after disclosure of their HIV positive status.</p> <p><strong>Methodology:</strong> A qualitative study was conducted a Comprehensive Care Centre in a national referral Hospital in Kenya. The study population included parents/guardians of HIV positive children with complete disclosure of their HIV status. Data was collected through in-depth interviews. The socio-demographic characteristics of the respondents were analysed using descriptive statistics. The qualitative data is analysed by use of content analysis and presented in themes and narratives.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong> The results revealed that caring for these children was more challenging before disclosure than after disclosure. The main challenge was in responding to the children’s questions in regards to their health status. The questions asked by the children before disclosures include the reason for treatment, clinic follow up and when treatment will stop among others. The study further established that the parents/guardians expressed diverse fears of how the children might react during disclosure; however, the children mostly did not display the feared reactions at the moment of disclosure. Finally, the findings of this study established that care after disclosure becomes easier and that the children become more engaged in their own care.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong> The study found that caring for HIV positive children is less challenging after disclosure of their HIV status.&nbsp; Further, fears by caregivers are unfounded and there are minimal negative reactions by the children upon disclosure. In order to become actively engaged in their own care, children as early as 11 years old need to be informed about their positive HIV status.</p> <p><strong>Unique contribution to practice, theory and policy:</strong> The healthcare providers should ensure early preparation of the caregivers for disclosure to the children of their HIV status. Further, community members and school teachers need to be educated about the beneficial effects of disclosure of an HIV diagnosis to a child or adolescent. Research is needed on the development and implementation of caregiver support groups similar to that of children living with HIV.</p> <p><strong>Purpose:</strong> Caring for HIV positive children poses various challenges and uncertainties depending on the disclosure of their status. To explore the caregivers’ experiences in caring for HIV positive children before, during and after disclosure of their HIV positive status.</p> <p><strong>Methodology:</strong> A qualitative study was conducted a Comprehensive Care Centre in a national referral Hospital in Kenya. The study population included parents/guardians of HIV positive children with complete disclosure of their HIV status. Data was collected through in-depth interviews. The socio-demographic characteristics of the respondents were analysed using descriptive statistics. The qualitative data is analysed by use of content analysis and presented in themes and narratives.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong> The results revealed that caring for these children was more challenging before disclosure than after disclosure. The main challenge was in responding to the children’s questions in regards to their health status. The questions asked by the children before disclosures include the reason for treatment, clinic follow up and when treatment will stop among others. The study further established that the parents/guardians expressed diverse fears of how the children might react during disclosure; however, the children mostly did not display the feared reactions at the moment of disclosure. Finally, the findings of this study established that care after disclosure becomes easier and that the children become more engaged in their own care.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong> The study found that caring for HIV positive children is less challenging after disclosure of their HIV status.&nbsp; Further, fears by caregivers are unfounded and there are minimal negative reactions by the children upon disclosure. In order to become actively engaged in their own care, children as early as 11 years old need to be informed about their positive HIV status.</p> <p><strong>Unique contribution to practice, theory and policy:</strong> The healthcare providers should ensure early preparation of the caregivers for disclosure to the children of their HIV status. Further, community members and school teachers need to be educated about the beneficial effects of disclosure of an HIV diagnosis to a child or adolescent. Research is needed on the development and implementation of caregiver support groups similar to that of children living with HIV.</p> Drusilla Makworo Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Health, Medicine and Nursing 2021-10-02 2021-10-02 7 2 45 55 10.47604/jhmn.1384 MEN KNOWLEDGE/AWARENESS LEVEL ON BIRTH PREPAREDNESS AND COMPLICATION READINESS IN MAGARINI SUB COUNTY https://www.iprjb.org/journals/index.php/JHMN/article/view/1388 <p><strong><em>Purpose:</em></strong> This study sought to find out the knowledge/awareness level of men on birth preparedness and complication readiness in Magarini Sub County.</p> <p><strong>Methodology:</strong> A cross-sectional study sequential mixed methods design was used where a total of 464 men will be enrolled. Quantitative data was collected using semi structured questionnaires and interview guides were used to collect qualitative data.&nbsp; Quantitative data was coded, and analyzed by SPSS software.&nbsp; Qualitative data was analyzed using NVIVO software. Chi- square test was used to determine associations between categorical variables and Logistics regression was used to identify factors associated with birth preparedness and complication readiness. The associations between awareness and each independent variable were determined by odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Thematic content analysis was applied for qualitative data analysis.</p> <p><strong><em>Findings:</em></strong> The result indicated that the odds of pregnancies resulting &nbsp;in a baby that was born alive were 47.306 times higher for more than two pregnancies as compared to one pregnancy(Odds=47.306,p=0.000). The odds of pregnancies resulting &nbsp;in a baby that was born alive were 16.25 times higher for one&nbsp; pregnancies as compared to no&nbsp; pregnancy(Odds=16.25,p=0.000).</p> <p><strong><em>Unique contribution to theory, practice and policy</em></strong> Birth Preparedness and Complication Readiness (BPACR) should be endorsed as an essential component of safe motherhood programs to reduce delays for care-seeking for obstetric emergencies and this has been proven to positively impact on birth outcomes</p> <p><strong>Keywords:</strong> knowledge/awareness level<em>, birth preparedness, complication</em><em> readiness, Magarini Sub County</em></p> Leila Chepkemboi Yeri Kombe A.O. Makokha Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Health, Medicine and Nursing 2021-10-07 2021-10-07 7 2 53 60 10.47604/jhmn.1388 HEALTHCARE PROVIDER PATIENT VERBAL LANGUAGE USE ON DIABETES MELLITUS MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN SELECTED HOSPITALS IN KENYA https://www.iprjb.org/journals/index.php/JHMN/article/view/1391 <p><strong>Purpose:</strong> To establish the effect of healthcare provider patient verbal language use on diabetes mellitus management practices in selected hospital in Kenya.</p> <p><strong>Methodology:</strong> This was a causal comparative research study design with application of quantitative and qualitative methodology. The study was carried out at the outpatient diabetic clinics of Kenyatta National Hospital and MP Shah Hospital. 400 patient participants were involved in the study and comprised of 313 patients at Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH) and 87 patients at MP Shah respectively studied between the months of February 2019 and November 2019. A researcher administered questionnaire was used to collect data. The results were summarized using percentages and means or medians for categorical and continuous data respectively. Comparisons were done using chi square test of association of categorical variables and independent t-test for comparison of means. Linear regression and ANOVA were used to test for associations and hypothesis between healthcare provider patient verbal language use (VLU) and diabetes mellitus management practices (DMMPs).</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong> Patients at MP Shah Hospital rated the verbal language use significantly higher than the patients at KNH (p&lt; 0.001). However, linear regression analysis showed that verbal language use was not statistically significant overall in Kenya [β=0.04, (95% CI -0.09, 0.17), p=0.552], at KNH [β=0.05, (95% CI -0.10, 0.19), p=0.513] and MP Shah Hospital [β=0.09, (95% CI -0.21, 0.39), p=0.552]; (P &gt; 0.05), hence the failure to reject the null hypothesis. Therefore, there was no significant effect of verbal language use by the healthcare provider and the patient on diabetes mellitus management practices in selected hospitals Kenya.</p> <p><strong>Unique contribution to theory, practice and policy</strong><strong>:</strong> Verbal language use though important in healthcare provider patient interactions was not responsible for improvement in the diabetes mellitus management practices among the patients. Therefore, verbal language use by the healthcare providers in their communication interaction with patients need to be reinforced in healthcare practice to ensure improved DMMPs. Strategies should be developed to enhance verbal language use through educational curriculum development and implementation at the medical training institutions.</p> Geoffrey Ungaya Hellen Mberia Kyalo Wa Ngula William Sigilai Saira Sokwalla Copyright (c) 2021 Journal of Health, Medicine and Nursing 2021-10-15 2021-10-15 7 2 61 98 10.47604/jhmn.1391